Using your email address as your Drupal username

It can be difficult to remember all of the usernames and passwords that you use to log in to various websites across the internet, so why force users to create a new username for your web site? It's easier on everyone to simply combine the username and email address fields. It also cleans up your registration form a bit.

In Drupal, there are two modules that can help you to accomplish this:

Migrating a Drupal site between servers via Drush

As of Drush 4.5, migrating a Drupal site between servers became much easier. The new, little-known drush archive-dump and drush archive-restore commands make it an essentially three step process.

Overview

A basic Drupal site is made of two fundamental elements: the codebase and the database. When you migrate a Drupal site, you need to migrate both of these elements, often with a bit of re-configuration to boot.

Drupal - Conditionally hiding CCK fieldgroups

Conditional Fields is a great Drupal module for conditionally hiding CCK fields.

Unfortunately, it can't hide CCK fieldgroups. It's also not ideal if you're concerned about security— it simply hides fields; it doesn't deny access. A recent project of mine required that I conditionally deny access to field groups, so I decided to implement a programmatic solution.

In this case, I needed to deny access to specific fieldgroups in content type 'company' based on:

Drupal - overriding filefield theming

Drupal's default 'Generic File' format can be a bit ugly. Luckily, it's not too hard to override. If you'd like to change the default filefield theming for 'Generic File', try using the theme_filefield_item() function in your template.php file.

Note: You may also be interested in checking out my post on customizing the filefield format in views.

In the example below, I overrode the default theming for all cck fieldfields belonging to node type 'publication'.